Original Research

Clientelism and vote buying in low-cost housing provision: A case study of the Greater Giyani Local Municipality, Limpopo province of South Africa

Ntwanano E. Mathebula, Mokoko P. Sebola
Africa’s Public Service Delivery & Performance Review | Vol 8, No 1 | a364 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/apsdpr.v8i1.364 | © 2020 Ntwanano E. Mathebula, Mokoko P. Sebola | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 19 November 2019 | Published: 07 December 2020

About the author(s)

Ntwanano E. Mathebula, Department of Public Administration, Faculty of Management and Law, University of Limpopo, Polokwane, South Africa
Mokoko P. Sebola, Department of Public Administration, Faculty of Management and Law, University of Limpopo, Polokwane, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: This article seeks to examine ethical dilemmas and clientelism in the allocation of low-cost houses using 10 selected villages under the jurisdiction of the Greater Giyani Local Municipality area as units of analysis. The hypothesis of the initial research was that political parties in control of government machinery employ low-cost houses as electioneering instruments.

Aim: The aim of the article therefore is to investigate the extent to which clientelism and clientelistic strategies such as vote buying are pertinent to the housing provision.

Setting: The research was guided by this question: what are the features of clientelism and their extent to the provision of low-cost houses at the Greater Giyani Local Municipality area?

Methods: Mixed methods approach was used to solicit primary data in relation to clientelism and vote buying in the provision of low-cost houses.

Results: The findings as presented in the article suggest that clientelism and vote buying are used in the allocation of low-cost houses but not to a larger extent as assumed. The findings therefore are not presenting a crystal clear picture regarding the manifestation of clientelism and vote buying specifically in relation to low-cost housing allocation.

Conclusion: The article makes a significant contribution to the discourse on housing allocation in general and low-cost houses in particular, especially given the fact that it is located within clientelism and the strategies used in electioneering. The article further contributes to the discipline of Public Administration, Public Policy and to some extent politics. Studies in these areas fail to give attention to issues of public policy, ethics and clientelism. Municipalities and other housing provision authorities stand to benefit from the findings and the recommendations thereof. The article has the potential to shape legislative frameworks and procedures through which low-cost houses are allocated.


Keywords

clientelism; vote buying; low-cost houses; electioneering; ethical dilemmas.

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