Original Research

Community work programmes as job creation mechanism: A case of Tshwane Metropolitan municipality

Keoagile C. Kobedi, Elana Swanepoel, Marius Venter
Africa’s Public Service Delivery & Performance Review | Vol 10, No 1 | a590 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/apsdpr.v10i1.590 | © 2022 Keoagile C. Kobedi, Elana Swanepoel, Marius Venter | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 12 August 2021 | Published: 31 January 2022

About the author(s)

Keoagile C. Kobedi, Centre for Local Economic Development, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Elana Swanepoel, Centre for Local Economic Development, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Marius Venter, Centre for Local Economic Development, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: To address poverty and unemployment, local government implemented programmes, such as the Community Work Programme (CWP), aimed at empowering the community through the provision of employment and skills to provide a safety net to the poor by allowing them to earn a monthly wage.

Aim: This study aimed to investigate the CWP’s contribution towards employment or job creation within Region 1 of the Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality community, specifically in Erasmus and Soshanguve.

Setting: A CWP was started 11 years ago in the City of Tshwane, in Region 1 – Erasmus and Soshanguve. It provides wages to 2000 people.

Method: A cross-sectional quantitative survey was conducted using a structured questionnaire with a face-to-face interview of 219 respondents.

Results: The results reveal that the CWP is contributing financially to the well-being of the participants, but the latter tend to stay with the CWP and do not progress to permanent employment. Although some participants intend to start their own business, it seems they lack the skills.

Conclusion: Although participants benefited financially and socially, it seems that limited skills were acquired, particular entrepreneurial skills relevant to starting an own business venture. It is recommended that the data be further analysed with regard to the level of satisfaction and skills capacity development by the CWP.


Keywords

community work programme; job creation; local economic development; municipality; community empowerment; skills development; Tshwane municipality; satisfaction level; entrepreneurial skills

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